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How Bleen Was My Kelly was the 5th episode aired in Season 10 of Married... with Children and the 214th overall series episode. Directed by Gerry Cohen and written by Kim Weiskopf, the episode originally aired on FOX, premiering on October 15, 1995.

SynopsisEdit

Kelly has unknowingly created a new color chemical called Bleen and Al quickly finds out that she has created a new formula that grows hair.

StorylineEdit

In order to prepare for her role as Marie Curie in a made-for-TV movie, Kelly poses as a scientist on a grant from Crayola to invent a new color she calls "Bleen" and mixes a bio-hazardous chemical as part of her cover, which she brings home to hide in Al's shower where she thinks it'll be safe. Al, however, just happens to be taking his bimonthly shower and uses it, believing it's regular shampoo, but it ends up vigorously re-growing his hair. It's unfortunate side effect is that it makes him and the other members of NO MA'AM who are testing it more attentive to their women, so Al begs Kelly to make an antidote. She returns to the lab and experiments on Bud till she finds it. Peg tries to find a person who makes less money than Al using the computer and finds herself.

TitleEdit

A play on the 1941 film "How Green was My Valley" with Walter Pidgeon and Maureen O'Hara.

Recurring cast/character regularsEdit

Guest starringEdit

TriviaEdit

  • The morphing montage when Kelly is testing various Bleen antidotes on Bud (as well as its' backing instrumental) are a reference to the 1991 Michael Jackson single "Black or White".

GoofsEdit

  • Bud explains to Kelly who Madame Curie was and argues that Curie was a French scientist. Curie really was Polish (born Maria Sklodowska). Curie was her married name (she wed French scientist Pierre Curie).

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